Fenestration Review

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AAMA releases new specification for third-party finishes applied to PVC exteriors


August 20, 2014
By Carey Fredericks


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Aug. 20, 2014 – The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) has released AAMA 663-14, “Voluntary Specification for In-Process Quality Control Requirements for Applicators of Organic Coatings to Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) Exterior Profiles,” which establishes the minimum requirements for applicators of organic coatings to PVC exterior profiles that are used in windows, doors and skylights.

AAMA Pella Whitney webAug. 20, 2014 – The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) has released AAMA 663-14, “Voluntary Specification for In-Process Quality Control Requirements for Applicators of Organic Coatings to Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) Exterior Profiles,” which establishes the minimum requirements for applicators of organic coatings to PVC exterior profiles that are used in windows, doors and skylights.

“This new document is important to the fenestration industry because it lets consumers know that the finish applied to their AAMA-certified windows has been done properly and in accordance with the standards AAMA intended,” says David Harris (Renolit), chair of the Third Party Finishes Certification Task Group.

Harris adds that this standard is a guideline for in-process quality control during the application of paints to windows, doors and skylights made of PVC. In the past, standards existed for extruders or window manufacturers when working with the paint process, but there was no AAMA standard for in-process quality control when painting was being done at outside contractors.

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“From an applicator’s perspective, it gives the ability to substantiate that the application process is being followed to the defined standards,” says Mark Bamford (Milgard), vice chair of the task group. “From a manufacturer’s perspective, it gives them an additional quality check from their external vendor to make sure that application process is going correctly. It provides some oversight.”

Bamford adds that sometimes vendors may check paint and then store any unused excess, but then not test the remaining paint later. This will no longer be the case.

“This allows testing to occur at the point of application and not just at the receipt of product,” says Bamford. “It gives enhanced material quality control.”

For more information
http://www.aamanet.org/
AAMA’s publication store